The 12 Steps

The 12 Steps of Recovery

The 12 Step Fellowship is the approach of AA, NA, OA, (Alcoholics, Narcotics and Overeaters Anonymous).  By basing your recovery on the 12 Steps you are guaranteed life-long fellowship and support through these organisations. During treatment in Western Counselling, you will develop an understanding of all 12 Steps. In Phase I you will be supported to work through and complete Steps 1-3 and in Phase II Steps 4-7. The rest of the Steps will be worked through with a 12 Step Sponsor when you leave treatment.  The following are an adaptation of the 12Steps process, which give a clear description of the Step and its purpose:

Step One: We make a start by looking at past behaviours, and realising that the addiction has made life unmanageable. There must be acceptance that drinking alcohol or drug taking is no longer an option.

Step Two: We become positive about recovery and believe that with help from others, recovery can and will happen and will be worthwhile.

Step Three:  We make a conscious decision to embark on a new clean and sober way of life, a way of life based on total abstinence from alcohol or drugs, and that trust must be the basis of this lifestyle.

Step Four:  Cleaning the mind.  We look honestly and thoroughly at our actions and behaviours in the past and the harm done to others and ourselves by those actions.

Step Five: Looking forward.  By telling an understanding but non-judgemental person about all our destructive actions and behaviours, we can put the past behind, and look forward to a clean and sober future.

Step Six: We face up to the behaviour and personality traits which have been part of our addiction and which have helped maintain that addiction.

Step Seven:  We make a commitment to change our behaviour and personality traits.

Step Eight: We make an honest list of people we have harmed through our addiction, and becoming willing to make up for those past behaviours.

Step Nine: We make amends to people we have harmed through our drinking or addiction, unless to do so would cause further harm.

Step Ten: On a regular basis, we should examine our motives and behaviour and ensure that they are acceptable. If they are not, then they must be changed.

Step Eleven: We take time to reflect on the way forward, and to develop meditative thought in order to allow spiritual development.

Step Twelve: Now that recovery is well under way, we need to maintain that recovery through helping others to do the same, and by following the recovery principles in every situation.

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